Remembrance Field

Poppy Field

Congleton Museum’s Remembrance Field is now on display. Woven by museum volunteer Trish Lovell from donated plastic bags, and with poppies added by visitors, this fantastic poppy field can be seen in the foyer of the museum.

The field started life as a small sample which Trish then decided to enlarge in commemoration of WWI. With recycled plastic bags donated by Argos (blue), M&S and Spar (yellow), and Congleton Council (greens), the vista took shape over a number of weeks. As Trish wove the field on a peg loom in the museum, visitors were able to name poppies in remembrance and insert them into the fabric. All poppies were kindly donated by the Royal British Legion.

When the field was completed a banner was added with the words from John McCrae’s famous poem: ‘In Flanders fields the poppies blow’. The field was in place for Remembrance Sunday where it attracted comparisons to the Poppy Moat at the Tower of London . Trish said, ‘If people can genuinely consider that my idea for my weaving is anywhere near the league of the moat poppies, then I am highly honoured’.

The Remembrance Field will be on display at the museum for the foreseeable future.

 

Rotary Club WW1 Concert

RAF Band

The Rotary Club of Congleton is proudly hosting a WWI commemorative concert in aid of Congleton Museum and The Royal British Legion. The concert will be performed by the RAF College Band in the Town Hall on Sunday 28th September at 7pm. Tickets cost £15 and are available from Congleton Tourist Information Centre and Rotary Club Members. For more details, please contact: 07779 132656 or 07764-781657

Celebrating 100 years of Brownies

 

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Congleton Museum is celebrating 100 years of the Brownie Guides, in style, with a fantastic new exhibition.  Documenting the last hundred years of the Brownies, the exhibition reveals some of the little known history of the organisation.

Lord Baden-Powell decided to create a junior section of the Girl Guides in 1914, for girls of 8 to 11 years old. First called ‘Rosebuds’, the girls had to pass a basic entrance test before they could take their promise.  They had to be able to wash up the tea things, hem a duster, and plait their own hair.  Originally in a uniform of dark blue, the Rosebuds were encouraged to contribute to the local community.

The name change to ‘Brownies’ occurred in 1915 at the request of the girls.  It was based on Mrs. Ewing’s story of little people who did good turns.  With the motto of ‘Lend a Hand’ the Brownies set out to do just that.

Over the next 100 years, hundreds of thousands of little girls have joined up to gain badges, help their communities and have lots of fun in the process.  “Girlguiding is the leading charity for girls and young women in the UK, with 546,406 members,” said Cheshire Border Heritage Adviser, Ann Harris.  “We give girls and young women a space where they can be themselves, build brilliant friendships, gain valuable life skills and make a positive difference to their lives.”

The brand new promise of 2013 shows how the principles of the Brownies have little changed from 1914, with an emphasis on doing their best, helping other people and keeping the Brownie Guide Law.

The free-of-charge exhibition runs until 7th August, so be sure to pop in and take a look at the surprising history of the Brownie Guides.

A brilliant book launch for local historian

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A brilliant book launch for local historian Lyndon Murgatroyd!
Congleton Museum welcomed over 100 visitors to the launch of ‘Lest We Forget’, which tells of the experiences of Congleton’s servicemen through both world wars. Over £2000 worth of books were sold and Lyndon kindly donated two boxes of books valued at £360 to the museum. (Lyndon and his wife Sue are pictured centre).